.one too many.

…a place for waste…

what color is your mid-life crisis??

with 11 comments

rock bottom smells like lighter fluid and sockless feet.

it drinks black void and spews death rattles from it’s opposable mouths.

it’s color scheme is octopus orange with swaths of old grey crackle napkins.

it’s shape is asymettrical octagonal and it is a passive-aggressive self-mutilator.

it’s face splinters like tree bark when it smiles and its hands are withered like dried fruit.

its innards are confused…

stomach has become liver.

lung has morphed with spleen.

heartbeats sound like crying babys.

it hasn’t enjoyed sex since the carter administaration

it hasn’t had a nibble of nutrition since it ate it’s own leg.

it used to carry a sledgehammer but it grew too heavy.

now it carries a keychain.

most will look at it and see the pain of the world.

most will whisper, stare and cringe in it’s presencene.

most will shudder and move closer to their loved ones when it passes by.

but not me.

not me.

it is mine.

and it will be mine until one of us dies.

i not not you not possible.

rv-9rv-5rv-10rv-17rv-21

the interior had hepatitis.

rv-29rv-28rv-35

rv-49rv-42rv-43

this might be love.

rv-57

stay tuned.

Advertisements

Written by canepari

September 11, 2009 at 10:21 pm

11 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. She’s beautiful. Well. She’s a Sportsman so I suppose she could be a Boy but.

    Congratulations. I think the matching bucket Brady Bunch seats just rock.

    Over at Cafe Selavy he’s been writing about a long ago Road Trip. I left him this song:

    Hope it all works out.

    Lisa

    lisa

    September 12, 2009 at 3:23 pm

  2. She’s Gooseberry’s embarrassing, overweight, batty great-aunt? What’s her name? Slurpee?

    Pervis Ellison

    September 14, 2009 at 2:22 am

  3. don’t be rude, pervis. and definitly don’t put gooseberry on a pedestal. she was no spring chicken…

    blah!

    canepari

    September 14, 2009 at 12:22 pm

  4. it’s the most beautiful thing i’ve ever SEEEEEEEN!! AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!! Come scoop me already!!!

    icecreeem

    September 15, 2009 at 8:36 pm

  5. Hoooly Shaggin’ Wagon!

    Chris Casatelli

    September 16, 2009 at 2:54 am

  6. would love to take the sportsman cross country on us 50 all the way baby.

    pmoore

    September 16, 2009 at 2:01 pm

  7. hope you’re keeping those chairs!

    Sophie Jacobson

    September 17, 2009 at 4:44 pm

  8. You’re pronouncing that Bro-Ham, right?

    And is that champagne or a garden hose exploding? Either way… it’s like a Bollywood love scene. Gold.

    Godspeed. Come pick me up.

    Will

    September 17, 2009 at 10:55 pm

  9. Loved the article We 2 trceheas from Brisbane other from Cairns (AUS) ..friends for many years are leaving family at home to fend for themselves (bonding) while we explore some of beautiful Turkey. We will be in Kas next year 15, 16, & 17 September 2012 heading to Cirali on 18th . WE want to visit a school there & give some childrens book from Australia to the school when does school go back ? we may be too early. thankyou can’t wait to get therecheers Heather

    Matias

    January 4, 2013 at 2:41 pm

  10. , designers seem to be doing a beettr job at focusing on the mass market. As we move into smaller spaces we require multi-pupose furniture which can be seen for sale at IKEA and other places. Personalization is high priority too. Everyone wants to make their own statement. But do we know what the center of the home is now? What role do kitchens play? I think there are many answers to those questions as our families and living space needs become more diverse. One challenge as new designers is finding our market. In some ways, there are so many markets that you can choose what you want to make and you can probably find a niche market somewhere. However, you may struggle to make it because the market is too segmented to support designers who only choose one niche.I shared this article with my mom and we discussed how she is interested in how America transitioned from the 3o’s to the war to the 50 s. We talked about my grandparents, married in 1950. My mom was puzzled by the talk of large, chromed refrigerators because she remembers the fridges she grew up with and they didn’t fit that description. We decided that my grandparents were too poor to follow trends at that point they farmed and were just trying to make it there are no pay raises when you farm. But my mom does remember her mother being frustrated when she was able to purchase appliances. My grandmother was frustrated that in order to get something that didn’t break right away, you had to buy up the social ladder’ as the article said, meaning that you were paying for a status symbol that you didn’t care about just to get something that worked. Before WWII, there were not as many choices when it came to things like washing machines (wringers at that time) and so the question was whether you could afford it, not whether it would work. In the years after this article, we have begun designing things with a shelf life, things designed to break. I have seen my grandma become even more resigned to buying junk, even though she has to pay a lot for it. Unfortunately, I think we have larger issues than aesthetic challenges and reading social status. As designers, we also have to deal with the fact that you used to be able to buy things that worked, assuming you had enough resources. Today, our market has become so used to disposable goods that we will have to fight to make the public understand the cost of value and fight to reestablish the integrity of a brand.I apologize if this post rambles too much I am still trying to digest all of this myself

    Xochitl

    February 23, 2013 at 8:28 am

  11. 6KNJKC cbemokekldmu

    iuxqpmuix

    February 26, 2013 at 2:13 pm


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: